Advances in Applied Psychology
Articles Information
Advances in Applied Psychology, Vol.1, No.2, Oct. 2015, Pub. Date: Aug. 3, 2015
Family and Socio-Demographic Background of Violence Among Adolescent Population in Dubai, UAE
Pages: 120-127 Views: 2356 Downloads: 1152
Authors
[01] Alshareef N., School and Educational Institutions Health Unit, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[02] Hussein H., School and Educational Institutions Health Unit, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[03] Al Faisal W., School and Educational Institutions Health Unit, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[04] El Sawaf E., Staff Development, Health Centers Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[05] Wasfy A., Staff Development, Health Centers Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[06] AlBehandy N. S., School and Educational Institutions Health Unit, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
[07] Altheeb A. A. S., School and Educational Institutions Health Unit, Health Affairs Department, Primary Health Care Services Sector, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE.
Abstract
Backgrounds: Adolescent violence is a broader public health problem. Adolescent violence is the intentional use of physical force or power by a young person, between the ages of 10 and 24, against another person, group, or community, with the youth’s behavior likely to cause physical or psychological harm. Objectives: To study the family and socio-demographic background of violence among adolescent population in Dubai. Methodology: This is a cross sectional study. The study was conducted among students in preparatory and secondary schools “Governmental and Private” in Dubai city in U.A.E. Computer program EPI-Info version "6.04” was used for calculation of the minimum sample size required. It was 1046. A sample of 1,046 students was randomly selected from preparatory and secondary schools in Dubai. A stratified random sampling was used. The strata were based upon geographical districts (Bur Dubai and Diera). Results: The violence was significantly highest among students less than 13 years (OR = 1.94) which decreased gradually as age gets older. Males have significantly 1.64 times the likelihood of committing violence and students from Bur Dubai had also about 3 times the risk of committing violence compared to those from Deira. Also local students had double the likelihood of committing violence in contrast to non locals. Last ranked students among siblings had significantly. living with one parent due to separation affects significantly the risk of committing violence (OR = 2.33). Those who reported fear of father or older brother/sister had significantly higher risk of committing violence compared to those who said that they love them (2.51 and 2.60 times risk respectively). Conclusions: Family circumstances and school environment as another possible contributing factors elaborated important relations with violence among schoolchildren in this study. Violence prevention and intervention program to be targeting adolescents at higher risk of involvement in violence as those with family problems, and low school performance. Close supervision of the students at the school, is essential for prevention and early management of violence incidents.
Keywords
Family Background, Violence, Adolescent, Dubai
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