American Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development
Articles Information
American Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development, Vol.4, No.1, Mar. 2019, Pub. Date: Mar. 5, 2019
Detection and Monitoring of Forest Fires in Dinder National Park, Sudan During 2010 - 2014 Using Remote Sensing Technology
Pages: 1-5 Views: 1394 Downloads: 579
Authors
[01] Kawther Suliman Mohammed, Department of Forest Conservation and Protection, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Shamat, Sudan.
[02] Yousif Elnour Yagoub, Department of Forest Conservation and Protection, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Shamat, Sudan.
[03] Ahmed Ali Hassbelkreem Siddig, Department of Forest Conservation and Protection, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Shamat, Sudan.
[04] Omer Said Musa, Department of Forest Conservation and Protection, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Shamat, Sudan.
[05] Mohammed Elgamri AtaaElmanan Ibrahim, College of Forestry and Range Science, Sudan University of Science and Technology, Soba, Sudan.
[06] Mohamed Mohamadein Abdullah Adam, Department of Forest Conservation and Protection, Faculty of Forestry, University of Khartoum, Shamat, Sudan.
Abstract
This study aims to monitoring forest fire in Dinder National Park (DNP), Sudan, which is considered one of the richest biodiversity spots in the country. Being a typical savanna ecosystem, DNP is embedded in a highly fire-prone environment. The overall objectives of the study is to monitoring forest fire in DNP during 2010 - 2014, also to determine the burned areas by using application of remote sensing and GIS. As such, GIS layers (e.g. fire occurrences) were collected from NASA database and the climate data were collected from the global weather archive. The results showed that the fire occurred in 219.6, 419.6, 454.5, 372.4 and 375.1 ha, for 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively (total area of DNP is about 1841.2 ha). During these four years, year 2012 witnessed a burning of about of 25% of the park area. Common causes of these forest fires in DNP include honey collection, farming and nomadic activities. We conclude that DNP authorities should focus on awareness-raising and extension programs to local communities to reduce the causes of these fire events but also to involve them in the management plan. Finally, this research provided insights about 5-years of fire patterns in DNP that can potentially be developed to a full wildfire database which can have substantial management implications in the future.
Keywords
Forest Fire, Remote Sensing, Dinder National Park
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