International Journal of Animal Biology
Articles Information
International Journal of Animal Biology, Vol.1, No.5, Oct. 2015, Pub. Date: Aug. 26, 2015
Eclosion Rhythm of Plodia interpunctella Under Non-24 h Thermocycles
Pages: 273-280 Views: 1975 Downloads: 905
Authors
[01] Shigeru Kikukawa, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[02] Yuta Kakihara, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[03] Yuki Okano, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[04] Renpei Shindou, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[05] Naoyuki Sugino, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[06] Jinnai Tsunekawa, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[07] Akihiro Yasui, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
[08] Kazuhito Yoneda, Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
Abstract
The present study focuses on the adult eclosion rhythm of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), under two non-24 h thermocycles of 30°C/20°C and 25.5°C/24.5°C in constant darkness (DD). The thermocycles were provided as two combinations: one with a constant 12-h thermophase (T) alternated with a cryophase (C) of varying durations (6-18 h) and the other with a constant 12-h C alternated with varying durations (6-18 h) of the T. For 30°C/20°C thermocycle with a constant 12-h T, the temporal position of the adult eclosion peak is observed to advance as the cycle length extends. The peak occurs within the T and appears at about 17 h after the temperature-fall. However, when the duration of the C is constant for 12 h, the average peak time of adult eclsion is Zt 5.0 after the temperature rises. Under the 25.5°C/24.5°C thermocycle, the temporal position of the adult eclosion peak is a function of the cycle length. As the insects do not experience non-24 h thermocycles in nature, our results provide clues to the basic nature of the time-keeping mechanism of P. interpunctella.
Keywords
Adult Eclosion Rhythm, Indian Meal Moth, Plodia interpunctella, Non-24 h Thermoperiod
References
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