International Journal of Education and Information Technology
Articles Information
International Journal of Education and Information Technology, Vol.4, No.1, Mar. 2019, Pub. Date: Jul. 7, 2020
School Climate, Academic Achievement and Student’s Personal Factors as Correlates of Interest in Schooling Among Undergraduates of University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Pages: 9-16 Views: 181 Downloads: 70
Authors
[01] Olubukola Adesola Oyebanji, Department of Educational Management, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
Abstract
This study examined school climate, academic achievement and student’s personal factors as correlates of interest in schooling among Undergraduates of University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Descriptive survey research design was adopted and structured copies of questionnaire were used to gather data. The study adopted multistage sampling procedure to select two hundred (200) undergraduates in University of Ibadan who participated in the study. The result revealed that school climate, academic achievement and students' personal factors had significant joint influence on interest in schooling (F(7,192) = 18.331; p<0.05), and out of school climate, academic achievement and students' personal factors (level of study, gender, age, religion and family background), school climate and academic achievement have significant independent influence on interest in schooling (=-0.234; t = -5.942; p<0.05. =0.497; t = 8.138; p<0.05. =0.266; t = 4.377; p<0.05) among Undergraduates of University of Ibadan, Nigeria. The study concluded that there was significant relative and joint influence of school climate and academic achievement on interest in schooling among Undergraduates of University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Therefore, it was recommended that University council and authority, counseling psychologists, educational administrators and parents should take cognisance of academic achievement and school climate in the development of any intervention to assist undergraduates with low or no interest in schooling.
Keywords
School Climate, Academic Achievement, Student’s Personal Factors, Interest in Schooling
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