International Journal of Education and Information Technology
Articles Information
International Journal of Education and Information Technology, Vol.1, No.2, Jun. 2015, Pub. Date: May 14, 2015
Debunking Post-Publication Peer Review
Pages: 34-37 Views: 2778 Downloads: 951
Authors
[01] Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva, Miki-Cho Post Office, Kagawa-ken, Japan.
Abstract
Science forms a fundamental core of many aspects of society. Many objects, functionalities, systems and processes are based on scientific principles and fundamentals. The latter two are often derived from scientific discovery which is traditionally built upon appropriate hypothesis testing, and exposed through published reports, in the form of scientific papers. Thus, any object or process that relies upon the methodology that underlies a scientific manuscript also relies on its basal premise of veracity. A scientific paper that has a flawed methodology – or errors contained therein – that is transmitted to third party users who do not suspect any flaws or errors can pose a potential threat to the integrity of science, and society. While processing a scientific paper, quality control is usually imposed through peer review, traditionally in a blind or double blind format, but also, in more rare cases, as open peer review, and thus there is shared responsibility by authors, editors, peers and publishers for what is ultimately released into the literature. Post-publication peer review (PPPR) serves to cover gaps inherent to traditional peer review. Where quality control has failed in the latter, the former can serve as an effective tool to cover those gaps. Correcting the literature after it has been published is an integral part of the publishing process and it is incumbent upon editors and publishers to provide the appropriate channels and means to allow for errors, problems and more serious issues related to publishing ethics, such as plagiarism, to be addressed. Scientific activism serves as one vocal tool to bring awareness to the wider scientific community and public about such issues. Literature that is not corrected will remain inherently flawed and corrupted, and will serve as a poor educational tool for young scientists. Poor science and corrupted literature represent a bad business model and can also represent a danger to society. Such issues, discussed here in this opinion piece, must be more openly, widely and publicly debated.
Keywords
Editorial Firewall, Expression of Concern, Peer Review, Plagiarism, Quality Control, Resistance
References
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