International Journal of Life Science and Engineering
Articles Information
International Journal of Life Science and Engineering, Vol.3, No.3, Sep. 2018, Pub. Date: Aug. 10, 2018
Preliminary Investigation into the Use of Rosselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) and Ugiri (Irvingia gabonesis) Fruits in Wine Production
Pages: 64-68 Views: 100 Downloads: 29
Authors
[01] Umeh Sophina Ogonna, Department of Applied Microbiology and Brewing, Faculty of Biosciences, NnamdiAzikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
[02] Okafor Ugochukwu Chukwuma, Department of Applied Microbiology and Brewing, Faculty of Biosciences, NnamdiAzikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
[03] Awah Nsikak Sunday, Department of Applied Microbiology and Brewing, Faculty of Biosciences, NnamdiAzikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
[04] Obasi Chinelo Jane, Department of Applied Microbiology and Brewing, Faculty of Biosciences, NnamdiAzikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
[05] Asogwa Blessing, Department of Applied Microbiology and Brewing, Faculty of Biosciences, NnamdiAzikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria.
Abstract
Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally vitisvinefera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients. Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Some fresh fruits, such as grape, orange, banana, apple, watermelon, cucumber and pineapple had been used for wine production. In this study, Ugiri (Irvingia gabonesis) and Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) were used for table wine production. Fresh Ugiri fruit were processed and sieved with Muslin cloth. Dried Roselle were washed, soaked in hot water and sieved with muslin cloth. The Ugiri and Roselle juice were mixed to obtain the must. The must was inoculated with the pure culture of strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sourced from a stock culture isolated from fresh fermented palm wine. Sodium metabisulphite was also added into the must. The solution was allowed to ferment and during which some parameters such as pH, reducing sugar, specific gravity, titrable acidity and alcohol content determination were carefully carried out. The pH of wine ranged from 5.8 to 3.5, the specific gravity of the wine ranged from 0.63 to 0.40 kg/m. Alcohol content of the fermented wine ranges from 0.33 to 0.74 kg/100ml and the reducing sugar of the fruit wine is from 0.67 to 0.38. The fermentation of Ugiri and Rosell must using Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to the successful production of wine.
Keywords
Wine, Fermentation, (Irvingia gabonesis), Sacharromyces cerevisiae and Hibiscus sabdariffa
References
[01] Okafor, N. (2007). Modern Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology. Science Publishers Enfield, 263-308.
[02] Amerine, M. A and kunkee, R. E. (2005). Microbiology of wine making. Annual Review of Microbiology, 2: 232-258.
[03] Idise, O. E. and Izuagbe, Y. S. (1988). Microbial and chemical changes in bottled palmwine during storage. Nigerian journal, 8 (1): 175-184.
[04] Madigan, M. T., John M, Martinko, paul V., Dunlap, David, p clark. (2009). International Microbiology (2008), 11: 65-73. Book reviews. Pearson Benjamin cummings, san Francisco, C. A. ISBN-0-13-232460-1.
[05] JosepH, J. K. (1995). Physico-chemical attributes of wild mango (Irvingiagabonensis) seeds. Bioresource Technology 53: 2.179-181.
[06] JosepH, K. & Aworh, O. C. (1992). Post-harvest treatment of wild mango (Irvingiagabonensis) for improved shelf life. Food Chemistry 44: 1 45-48.
[07] Ezeogu, L. I. and B. N. Okolo, 1994. Effects of final warm steeping and air-rest cycles on malt quality parameters of three improved Nigerian sorghum cultivars. J. Inst. Brew., 100: 335-338.
[08] Miller, G. L. (1959). Use of dinitrosalicylic acid reagent for determination of re-ducing sugar. Analytical Chem, 31 (3): 426-428.
[09] Ough, C. S and Amerine, M. A (1998). Methods for analyses of must and wines (2nded.). New York: John Wiley and Sons.
[10] Noah, A. A., Alechenu, J. O., Abiaziem, C. V., Oduwobi, O. O., (2013). Comparative Studies of Wine Produced From Pawpaw Juice and Coconut Milk at Different Proportions. Current Research on Nutrition Food Science, 1 (2).
[11] Agbor, A. A., Ben, U. M., Ubana, E. M., Olayinka, J. C. and Okon, A. E., (2011). Production, characterization and safety of wine obtained from a blend oftomato, almond, orange, lemon and African star apple extract. Scholars Research Library, Annalsof Biological Research, 2 (5): 492-503.
[12] Umeh, S. O., Agwuna, L. C., Okafor, U. C. (2017). Yeasts from Local Sources: An Alternative to the Conventional Brewer‟s Yeast. World Wide Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development, 3 (10): 191-195.
[13] Harrias, H. C., (2005). The Evolution, Dissemination and Classification of Cocos nucifera. Botany Review, 44: 265-320.
[14] Idise, O. E. and Ofiyai, O., (2011). Studies on Wine Production from Pawpaw (Carica papaya). Journal of Brewing Distilling. Vol. 2 (4) Pp. 56-62. ISSN 2141-21972 @Academic journals.
[15] Okafor Ugochukwu C, Edeh Jude I., Umeh Sophina O. (2018). Table Wine Production From Mixed Fruits Of Soursop (Annona Muricata) and Pineapple (Ananas Comosus) Using Yeast From Palm Wine."IOSR Journal of Environmental Science, Toxicology and Food Technology (IOSR-JESTFT) 12 (3): 52-56.
600 ATLANTIC AVE, BOSTON,
MA 02210, USA
+001-6179630233
AIS is an academia-oriented and non-commercial institute aiming at providing users with a way to quickly and easily get the academic and scientific information.
Copyright © 2014 - 2017 American Institute of Science except certain content provided by third parties.